LACMA

Stanley Kubrick
LACMA Art of the Americas Building, Level 2
November 1, 2012–June 30, 2013

Stanley Kubrick was known for exerting complete artistic control over his projects; in doing so, he reconceived the genres in which he worked. Kubrick’s relatively concise oeuvre is vast in the subjects, themes, and philosophies that he tackled. The exhibition covers the breadth of Kubrick’s practice, beginning with his early photographs for Look magazine, taken in the 1940s, which evidence his obsession with visual composition that continued to characterize his groundbreaking directorial achievements of the 1950s through the 1990s. His films are represented through a selection of annotated scripts, production photography, lenses and cameras, set models, costumes, and props. In addition, the exhibition explores Napoleon and The Aryan Papers, two projects that Kubrick never completed, as well as the technological advances developed and utilized by Kubrick and his team. Kubrick’s legacy continues in art, literature, and design, and his films remain vitally relevant today. By featuring this legendary film auteur and his oeuvre as the focus of his first retrospective in the context of an art museum, the exhibition reevaluates how we define the artist in the 21st century, and simultaneously expands upon LACMA’s commitment to exploring the intersection of art and film.

-JO 

Masterworks of Expressionist Cinema: Caligari and Metropolis
LACMA Ahmanson Building, Level 2
September 22, 2012–March 10, 2013

Expressionist cinema of the 1920s, so masterfully realized in two iconic examples, Dr. Caligari (1920) and Metropolis (1927), had a lasting impact on visual culture, giving rise to such popular genres as film noir, horror, and science fiction. Filmmakers Robert Wiene and Fritz Lang drew upon the broader Expressionist movement, which emerged in the 1910s and encompassed literature, theater, dance, and the graphic arts. The installation includes projected sequences, vintage posters, and set stills from these two iconic films, as well as selected prints from the Robert Gore Rifkind Collection demonstrating the stark black-and-white contrasts, off-kilter compositions, and exaggerated gestures that found their way from page to screen during the Weimar Republic (1919–33). The Expressionist legacy continues to inspire the imaginations of filmmakers, graphic novelists, and artists today.

-JO

Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol
LACMA BCAM, Level 2
June 4, 2012–September 9, 2012

The newest work by renowned Los Angeles artist Sharon Lockhart (United States, born 1964) is a multimedia meditation on the achievements of Israeli dance composer and textile artist Noa Eshkol (Israel, 1924–2007). Since the 1990s, Lockhart has memorialized specific, quotidian moments in particular communities using film and photography. She discovered Eshkol’s groundbreaking work during a 2008 trip to Israel. Eshkol is best known for developing in the 1950s, with architect Avraham Wachman, the Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation (EWMN) system, which uses a combination of symbols and numbers to define the motion of any limb around its joint. Eshkol developed a dance practice based upon its simple structures. Lockhart filmed Eshkol’s aging students and a newer generation of dancers performing her choreography in an effort to bring her visionary work to light. Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol, conceived as a two-person exhibition, presents Lockhart’s five-channel film installation and series of photographs of EWMN spherical models, together with a selection of Eshkol’s carpets, scores, drawings, and other archival materials.

 See some art this weekend before it’s gone! 

-JO

Michael Heizer: Actual Size
LACMA Resnick Pavilion & BCAM, Level 3
July 17, 2012–September 9, 2012

Michael Heizer’s ambitious, large-scale projects are often difficult to realize and just as difficult to document. In the Resnick Pavilion, and shown for the first time in more than three decades, Actual Size: Munich Rotary (1971) uses six custom film projectors to exhibit six spliced images at the original actual size of the artist’s 1969 negative sculpture, Munich Depression, built in the outskirts of Munich, Germany—a depression measuring one hundred feet in diameter by sixteen feet deep which displaced 1,000 tons of rock and earth.

Installed in BCAM is Michael Heizer: Actual Size, a series of fifteen individual photographic prints from 1970 of actual size monolithic rocks.  Taken together, Levitated Mass and these two installations make a statement that is both sweeping in scope and specific to our time. “We live in a world that’s technological and primordial simultaneously,” Heizer has said. “The idea is to make art that reflects this premise.”

See some art this weekend before it’s gone! 

-JO 

The Clock is back!

The Clock by Christian Marclay
24-Hour Screening starts – September 22, 12 pm to September 23, 12 pm
LACMA 

Bing Theater | Free; first-come first-served, no reservations | The Plaza Café will be open September 22 from 11 am to 11 pm and will be open again on September 23 from 8 am to 8 pm  | Ray’s will be open on September 22 from 11 am to 2 am and on September 23 from 11 am to 11 pm | Between 8 pm on September 22 and 11 am September 23, please enter the museum at Wilshire and Spaulding | Please park in the Spaulding lot on the corner of Wilshire and Spaulding; $10; free from 7 pm to 6 am | Film may not be appropriate for all ages.

The Clock
LACMA presents another special twenty-four-hour screening of Christian Marclay’s The Clock beginning Saturday, September 22, at noon and ending at noon on Sunday, September 23. The Clock is a twenty-four-hour single-channel montage constructed from thousands of moments of cinema and television history depicting the passage of time. Marclay has excerpted each of these moments from their original contexts and edited them together to create a functioning timepiece synchronized to local time wherever it is viewed—marking the exact time in real time for the viewer for twenty-four consecutive hours. The sampled clips come from films of all genres, time periods, and cultures, some lasting only seconds, others minutes, and have been culled from hundreds of films, famous and obscure, into a seamless whole. The result, a melding of video and reality, unfolds with a seemingly endless cast of cameos. By making the film available in its entirety, this free screening will allow The Clock to be viewed in the way Marclay intended. 

-JO

The Sun and Other Stars: Katy Grannan and Charlie White
LACMA BCAM, Level 2
July 22, 2012–October 14, 2012

Portraiture has always been motivated by two competing and overlapping desires: the desire to record, and the desire to be recorded. Artists Katy Grannan and Charlie White have examined this tension, exploring concepts of identity and subjectivity in a world increasingly dominated by media representations of the ideal self. The Sun and Other Stars presents two bodies of work that map the fragility and resilience of individuality in contemporary Western culture.

Grannan’s unflinching portraits capture adult subjects along the sun-struck boulevards of the American West, transforming them from obscurity to individuality with pathos and candor. White’s series of blonde teenage girls frames the popular and tyrannical appetite for celebrity with a deadpan lack of sentimentality. These two photographic series, accompanied by Grannan’s first film project and White’s new animation, A Life In B Tween, and personal collections of mass-culture ephemera, provide a visual vocabulary for an examination of the human subject and the encumbering effect of desire and aspiration.

Katy Grannan was born in Arlington, Massachusetts, in 1969. She received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania in 1991, and her MFA from Yale University in 1999. She lives in Berkeley, California.

Charlie White was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1972. He received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts, New York in 1995, and his MFA from Art Center College of Design, Pasadena, California, in 1999. He lives in Los Angeles.

The exhibition is curated by Britt Salvesen, head of LACMA’s Wallis Annenberg Photography Department. The exhibition includes 24 photographs and a three-channel video by Katy Grannan; and approximately 50 photographs, varied ephemera, and a video animation by Charlie White.

See some art this weekend before it’s gone! 
-JO

Another chance to see The Clock!

Christian Marclay’s The Clock: 24-Hour Screening
Saturday, March 24 2012 | 12pm – Sunday, March 25 | 12pm
Free at the Bing Theater | LACMA

“Join us for another twenty-four-hour screening of artist Christian Marclay’s The Clock beginning Saturday, March 24, at noon and ending at noon on Sunday, March 25. Awarded the prestigiousGolden Lion at last year’s Venice Biennale, The Clock is a twenty-four-hour single-channel montage constructed from thousands of moments of cinema and television history depicting the passage of time. Marclay has excerpted each of these moments from their original contexts and edited them together to create a functioning timepiece synchronized to local time wherever it is viewed—marking the exact time in real time for the viewer for twenty-four consecutive hours. The sampled clips come from films of all genres, time periods, and cultures, some lasting only seconds, others minutes, and have been culled from hundreds of films, famous and obscure, into a seamless whole. The result, a melding of video and reality, unfolds with a seemingly endless cast of cameos. By making the film available in its entirety, this free screening will allow The Clock to be viewed in the way Marclay intended.”

-JO 

« Older Entries